What’s on this Easter?

What’s on this Easter?

Easter Weekend Activites

Easter means different things to different people but to most of us it is an opportunity to spend time with family and with Spring blooming all around us it is time to get out the house and create some memories. And this year, Perthshire is bursting with family fun throughout the Easter weekend. Here’s a quick peek at some of eggcellent things happening around Perthshire this weekend.

Egg-tastic Fun at St Johns Shopping Centre

Join in for some egg-tastic fun at St Johns Shopping Centre this Saturday! Enjoy a selection of fun Easter activities including an Easter egg hunt and make your own mini egg Easter basket! The Easter bunny is also hopping in between these fun events!

Easter Crafts Eggstravanganza  

Join in at the Black Watch Castle & Museum for an egg-citing weekend of Easter themed family crafts. Get messy as you use paint, fabric, tissue paper, pens and glue to decorate boiled eggs and create egg-cellent Easter cards to take home.

Great Easter Egg Hunt

Join in for some Easter fun at the Great Easter Egg Hunt at Drummond Castle Gardens this weekend! Find the hidden Easter Eggs hidden around the gardens and see if you can find Henrietta’s golden egg and find and name the Chicks. There’s a prize for all Children!

Scone Palace Easter Sunday Pirate Funday

Visit Scone Palace this Easter Sunday for an action-packed Pirate Fun Day! There will be events throughout the day for swashbuckling families to enjoy! From pirate games and treasure hunts to meeting the Pirates and learning some top shipboard skills this is an event not to be missed!

Branklyn Gardens Easter Egg Hunt

The garden at Branklyn is unique, with its maze of paths weaving between trees and shrubs amongst beautiful spring flowers. Treat your loved ones to the magic of the Cadbury Easter Egg Hunt this Easter Weekend! Follow bunny’s clues and complete your adventure to win a delicious chocolatey prize.

Killiecrankie Easter Egg Hunt

Bring the family together this Easter Sunday at Killiecrankie and treat your loved ones to the magic of the Cadbury Easter Egg Hunt! Get ready for a day of fun! Follow bunny’s clues and complete your adventure to win a delicious chocolatey prize.

St John’s Shopping Centre Win Top Environmental Award

St John’s Shopping Centre Win Top Environmental Award

St John’s Shopping Centre Win Top Environmental Award

St John’s Shopping Centre has won a Scottish Green Apple Environment Award in the international campaign to find the greenest companies, councils and communities.

The shopping centre have won the award for their Greenspace project that was completed in partnership with children from Goodlyburn Primary School in 2018, where the children planned, designed and created an urban garden in the heart of Perth City Centre with the aim of creating space for biodiversity to thrive.

They competed against more than 500 other nominations in the Green Apple Awards for Environmental Best Practice, and they will be presented with their trophy and certificate at a glittering presentation ceremony on March 18, 2019.

Derek Martin, Marketing Manager at St John’s Shopping Centre said: “The whole team at St John’s Shopping Centre and the children of P1-3G at Goodlyburn Primary School were thrilled to learn that the project has been recognised by the industry leaders who judged our application.

“We are delighted to have won a Green Apple Award for Environmental Best Practice. Having also been finalists at the Scottish Environmental Business Awards earlier this year It’s great to see that our conscious effort to reduce our impact on the environment has been recognised yet again.”

As a result of this Green Apple Award success, they have been invited to have their winning paper published in The Green Book, the leading international work of reference on environmental best practice, so that others around the world can follow their example and learn from their achievement.

They could also progress to represent their country in the Green World Awards 2020 and have 100 trees planted in their name as part of the United Nations Billion Trees initiative.

The Green Apple Awards began in 1994 and have become established as the country’s major recognition for environmental endeavour among companies, councils, communities and countries.

The awards are organised by The Green Organisation – an international, independent, non-political, non-profit environment group dedicated to recognising, rewarding and promoting environmental best practice around the world. The Green Apple Awards are supported by the Environment Agency, the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health, the Chartered Institution for Wastes Management and other independent bodies.

St William of Perth

St William of Perth

St William of Perth

There can not be many cities in the country that has had one of its former inhabitants canonised and created a Saint.  The City of Perth has its own saint and here is his story.

There was a man called William who lived in Perth around the later years of the 1100s. He was a baker and was deeply religious, going to church every Sunday without fail. William was a kindly and considerate man who was liked and respected by the population of the Fair City.  When he had finished baking the days bread, he carefully took out one loaf from every ten and put it aside to give to the poor of the town.

Early one morning he was walking to his bakery as he passed St John’s Church he saw a wicker basket lying in the doorway.  Upon inspection, he saw that the basket contained a sleeping baby. William gently picked up this basket and took it to the warmth of his bakery.

 As he worked, he thought about this baby, it was clearly abandoned, he then decided as he had no children and was financially secure he could bring this child up as if it were his own.  The child was a wee boy and William named it David, he gave it a stable, good life with much love and kindness, the child was called by the locals David the Foundling and as the years rolled by grew up into a healthy young man helping his father in the bakery.

In 1201,  William realised he wanted to go on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land as he prepared he asked his son to accompany him on this journey. Grudgingly, David agreed, he had friends and a good life in Perth and was not at all keen on leaving the city.

The two men set off travelling through Scotland and into England visiting the religious sites as they went.  William and David were just a little bit north of the town of Rochester when they fell out and had a terrible argument at the roadside.  David in a fit of rage, struck his father a violent blow on the head, the older man fell to the ground, David then drew a dagger and cut his father’s throat.  He then robbed his benefactor and fled the murder scene.

A short time later a local woman who had a reputation of being mad stumbled upon the body.  The woman was wearing a garland of Honeysuckle upon her head. She stood staring quietly at the corpse for some time and then she took the Honeysuckle from her head and placed it on the head of the dead man.  After leaving the flowers on the cadaver for a while, she took it and set it back upon her head. In an instant, her madness was cured. She walked down into the town of Rochester, locals who knew this woman realised that her illness had left her and summoned the priests from Rochester Cathedral.  She told her story and took the holy men to the murder scene. William was taken back to the Cathedral and laid out on public display.

News of this murder and the mad woman being miraculously cured spread far and wide, folk with ailments flocked to the cathedral and touched the corpse.  Many were healed upon touching the body of William. William was buried within Rochester Cathedral, a chapel was built on the site of the murder. The sick and infirm flocked from all over the land to touch the grave and hopefully be healed.  The shrine of William became the second most popular holy shrine in England, second only to that of Thomas Becket at Canterbury.

William was canonised by Pope Alexander IV in 1256 and became St William of Perth, he is the patron saint of adopted children.  In 1883 a wall painting was found in Frindsbury Church near Rochester depicting William it was found to have been painted between 1256 and 1266.  He is still remembered in the town of Rochester, with a street in Rochester called St William’s Way, there was a Hospital in the town called St William’s Hospital and St William of Perth Primary School all pay homage to this man from Perth.

It is a shame that this child of Perth and his story seems to be better known in the South of England than it is in his home city.  Perhaps on his feast day the 23rd of May you might spare a thought for St William of Perth.

Written by Gary Knight

Can’t Get Enough of Gary’s Stories?

 

If you enjoyed this article, why not take a look at Garys book ‘No Fair City’?

Battles, regicides, executions, conspiracies, murders, floods, fires, crimes, punishments, and mayhem No Fair City by Gary Knight has them all. Delve into the darker side of historical Perth, where witches, smugglers, grave robbers, murderers, and thieves conduct their ghastly business. Learn how the guilty (and innocent) were tried, punished, and executed. Read how, in a world before health and safety, plague, fire, the merciless River Tay, and the Perth s lade, railways and roads, took their daily toll of townsfolk and visitors.

You can find it here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Picture Perfect Perthshire

Picture Perfect Perthshire

Picture Perfect Perthshire

It’s no secret Perthshire has some of the best viewpoints in Scotland. In fact, a quick search of Instagram returns over 140,000 photos tagged with #Perthshire.

From rolling hills and hidden lochs to idyllic towns and ancient castles and palaces – there’s enough natural beauty to keep any avid photographer content for weeks. And with so much to see and do on offer, it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the choice and miss out on some best views this country has to offer.
So this week, we have been working with amature photographers and Perthshire locals to help find the best viewpoints around the region.

Without any further ado, here’s a quick look at our favourite picture-perfect spots from around Perthshire!

1) Queens View, Pitlochry

Description: Queen’s view is one of the most popular in the region – and it’s not hard to see why. Overlooking the stunning Loch Tummel and Schiehallion, this viewpoint you don’t want to miss!

Distance from Perth City Centre:34 miles

Whilst your here, why not visit…

Highland Fling

The Pass of Killiecrankie is one of the most striking views in the whole country, so why not take it in from a different angle – by plunging down 40 metres below with a bungee cord attached to your feet!

Find out more

Atholl Palace

A historic four-star luxury hotel set in Highland Perthshire, Pitlochry, with spa, museum, award-winning gardens and break taking mountain and river views. Best of all, it’s just a 45-minute drive from Perth City Centre!

Find out more

Pitlochry Golf Course

With the 6-hole Lettoch Links course, a driving range and a fully-stocked pro-shop, it has everything you need for a fantastic day of golf in Highland Perthshire!

Find out more

2) Loch Turret

Description: Loch Turret Reservoir is one of the lesser-known lochs in Perthshire, however, it is certainly not to be overlooked as a great picture opportunity! This hidden gem is the perfect spot for a hill walk (or sledging!)

Distance from Perth City Centre: 23 miles

Whilst your here, why not visit…

The Famous Grouse Experience

Discover how the distillery’s single malt is blended to create one of the UK’s most popular blended whiskies.

Find out more.

The Crieff Hydro

Scotland’s leading Spa Hotel Resort has so much to do, with 60 in/outdoor activities and 5 quality eateries.

Find out more.

Innerpeffray Library

Discover Scotland’s oldest free, public
lending library: a museum where you can iterally touch the past.

Find out more.

3) Kinnoull Hill, Perth

Description: A list of Instagram-worthy spots around Perthshire would not be complete without mentioning Kinnoull Hill.  This viewpoint is only a short walk from Perth City Centre and offers magnificent views of the Tay Valley!

Distance from Perth City Centre: 2 miles

Whilst your here, why not visit…

Willowgate Activity Centre

A leading activites provider based just outside of Perth City Centre. Whether it’s in the water or on dry land, Willowgate has something for everyone!

Find out more.

A City Centre Eatery

Did you know that Perth was voted Scotland’s Food Town on the Year last year? Our city is bursting with independent coffeehouses and award-winning restaurants. Why not pop in and test a few of our eateries out?

Find out more

Scone Palace

Scone Palace is the true home of the Stone of Destiny and has been the seat of parliaments and the crowning place of the Kings of Scots, including Macbeth and Robert the Bruce.

Find out more.

4) The Hermitage, Dunkeld

Description: The Hermitage is perhaps one of the most visited nature spots in Perthshire and for a good reason! There’s plenty of picture opportunities in this natural woodland.

Distance from Perth City Centre: 20 miles

Whilst your here, why not visit…

The Atholl Arms Hotel

There are few more imposing sights in the Scottish Highlands than the grandeur of the Atholl Arms Hotel in Dunkeld, at the northern end of this delightful highland village.

Find out more.

Birnam Arts

A delightful multi-purpose arts, conferencing and entertainment venue encompassing the fantastic Foyer CafePotter’s Junction Gift Shop and the Beatrix Potter Exhibition.

Find out more

Loch of the Lowes Visitor Centre

From early April to late August, the star attraction is a pair of breeding ospreys, which nest just 150 metres from our observation hide.

Find out more.

5) Loch Earn, St Fillans

Description: A beautiful a freshwater loch with an amazing backdrop of Ben Vorlich and the surrounding mountain range. Definitely worth a look!
The loch is home to a Watersports Centre that offer multiple watersports activities.

Distance from Perth City Centre: 32 miles

Whilst your here, why not visit…

Auchingarrich Wildlife Park

Whatever the weather you’ll find plenty to see and do, with activities for all ages indoors and out. The centre has over 50 different species of animal, each with its own particular charm.

Find out more.

Cultybraggan POW Camp

Cultybraggan Camp, near Comrie, Perthshire is the last remaining WWII Prisoner of War (POW) Camp in Scotland.

Find out more.

Comrie’s Earthquake House

Did you know Comrie’s is the earthquake capital of the UK? As a result, the ‘earthquake house’ was built in 1874 to monitor tremors in the ground. Pop along and take a look at this unique piece of history!

Find out more.

Over to you!

Now you know where the best viewpoints are, it’s now over to get snapping. In case you aren’t familiar with Perthshire, here’s a map to help you find all the viewpoints mentioned above.

Make sure to follow us on Instagram to find more amazing photo spots from around Perthshire!

A Wilder Scotland in Perth: RSGS Talk

A Wilder Scotland in Perth: RSGS Talk

It wasn’t long ago that wild forests stretched their fingers across much of Scotland. Beavers and cranes found sanctuary in extensive wetlands, salmon and trout filled Scotland’s rivers, and lynx, wolf and wild boar stalked woodland glades.

Today, Scotland has become a much more nature-depleted nation. All of our large carnivores have gone and across huge areas the intricate and balanced ecosystem that emerged from the last ice age has unravelled.

It doesn’t have to be this way. A bold vision for Scotland’s future is evolving; a vision that sees native woodland regenerating; a vision where damaged peatlands are restored, and rivers lined by alder and willow run freely; a vision that sees a wilder landscape driven by natural processes, supporting a much broader range of wildlife than exists today.

This new vision is being spearheaded by a group of photographers and filmmakers who have spent the last three years gathering images to make the case for a wilder Scotland. And one of these campaigners is Peter Cairns, a conservation photographer based in the Cairngorms.

Now, Peter is speaking in Perth and showcasing his stunning images. With spectacular mountaintops and ocean floors, and featuring iconic species such as beavers, ospreys and pine martens, Peter will pose an intriguing question: What should Scotland look like?

Commenting on the upcoming talk, Peter said:

“I’m delighted to be part of an inspiring line up of speakers all with fascinating stories to tell. From my home in the Cairngorms, I’m lucky to be able to look out onto forests of Scots pine, hills of granite and the rushing waters of the River Feshie. Spectacular a place though this is, there are pieces missing.”

“Today, although it’s easy to be seduced by the raw beauty of the Scottish landscape, it is sadly an ecological shadow of its former self. Our native woodland covers just 2% of its former range, many species that were once prolific now teeter on the edge, and our large carnivores are all gone. My presentations for the Royal Scottish Geographical Society will showcase this country’s undoubted beauty and drama, but against a backdrop of global biodiversity decline”

Mike Robinson, Chief Executive of the RSGS remarked:

“Scotland’s landscape is one of its most treasured assets, and this talk by Peter will demonstrate our country’s raw beauty in spectacular fashion. It is, however, a landscape under pressure and one that is not as untouched by humans as it may first appear. I hope this talk will inspire our audiences to think more closely about ‘wilderness’ in general and some of the possible mechanisms we might adopt to conserve, re-invigorate and improve our natural assets.”

Peter will be speaking in Perth on Tuesday 12th March at 7.30pm in The Salutation Hotel, 34 South Street, Perth, PH2 8PH.

Tickets to see Peter are available via Eventbrite or on the door. They are £10 for visitors, £8 for Tiso Outdoor Experience Cardholders, and FREE for RSGS Members, Students and U18s.

Mary Queen of Scots and Loch Leven Castle

Mary Queen of Scots and Loch Leven Castle

January saw the opening of a new film about Mary Queen of Scots, and although I have yet still to go to the Playhouse in Perth to watch the film,  I thought I would write about a famous event involving Mary that took place in Perth and Kinross – the imprisonment of the queen at Loch Leven Castle.

Mary Queen of Scots is perhaps one of Scotland’s most tragic monarchs,  she was born in Linlithgow Palace on the 8th of December 1542.  Her father James V was not exactly over the moon when he was told of the birth of his daughter.  He was lying in his sick bed in Falkland Palace and upon receiving the news exclaimed rather sadly “it came wi a lass and it will gang wi a lass” he was referring to the Stewart or Stuart dynasty.   Mary’s father James died six days later on the 14th of December. 

The infant was crowned queen on the 9th of September 1543 she was less than a year old.  The King of England Henry VIII tried to persuade the Scottish nobility that the young queen should marry his son and when this was rejected he sent his armies into Scotland to force the issue.  This is referred to as the Rough Wooing, with Scotland being subjected to these English raids the queen was sent to France where she married the heir to the French throne in 1558.  The following year Mary’s husband was crowned Francois II of France.  The time in France was to be the happiest of her life, but it was not to last, for in 1560 the young French king died,  Mary was sent back to Scotland arriving in Leith in 1561.

Things were extremely difficult for her, she was a Catholic while most of her subjects including her nobility were Protestant.  Mary married her cousin Henry Stewart Lord Darnley in 1565, despite having a child together it was not a happy union.  Darnley was spoilt, immature and a womaniser.  He was manipulated into being involved in murdering Mary’s secretary David Rizzio, this crime was carried out in the queen’s chambers in Holyrood Palace.  Mary who was pregnant at the time never forgave her husband for his part in the murder.  Lord Darnley himself was to die in suspicious circumstances, while sick he was convalescing in a building called Kirk o Field in Edinburgh. 

One night while Mary was out celebrating a wedding Kirk o Field was blown up.  Darnley’s body was found outside in the grounds, he had been murdered.  The chief suspect in this assassination was Lord Bothwell, many people at the time also thought Mary herself had a hand in the killing of her husband.  Mary Queen of Scots then committed political suicide by marrying Lord Bothwell, this prompted a rebellion by her lords.  Mary was overthrown, she was taken into custody and them imprisoned in Loch Leven Castle.

Loch Leven castle sits on the biggest island on Loch Leven, it is owned by Historic Scotland and open to the public.  It is well worth a visit, especially on a nice day.  The castle was to be Mary’s prison for just over ten months arriving on the 17th of June 1567 and leaving on the morning of the 3rd of May 1568.  Imprisonment here was to be the low point of Mary’s time in Scotland, while held Mary miscarried twins that had been conceived with Lord Bothwell. Her jailers were The Douglases, a powerful family who had played a prominent role in Scotland’s history since the days of Robert the Bruce. 

Lady Douglas had been the mistress of the queen’s father King James V , she was the mother of James Stewart the Earl of Moray, Mary’s half brother, Moray was to become regent while Mary was locked up, running the country on behalf of the queen’s young son James VI.  The queen was confined to two rooms on the third floor of the tower.  Lady Douglas was to share a bedroom with the queen, so Mary had very little privacy.  She spent her long days walking in the garden or doing needlework. 

Her supporters on the outside were desperate to secure her freedom, they knew Mary’s life was in danger, her jailers had been told to kill Mary if an escape attempt was made by her followers.  Mary did make an effort to escape on one occasion a laundress had been brought to the castle and Mary who was up early swapped clothing with this woman. Covering her face, Mary made it down to the boat,  she was being rowed across the loch when one of the boatmen foiled the plan, he noticed how white, soft and smooth the ladies hands looked. 

A second attempt was to be successful, Mary was helped by one of her jailers he was Willie Douglas an eighteen-year-old youth who was captivated by the charismatic queen.  On the night of the 2nd of May, he managed to obtain the master key to the tower.  When the rest of the household were celebrating May Day with a masked ball, Willie made his way to the queen’s room.  Releasing the queen, they made their way to a boat and rowed across the loch to freedom.

Once free Mary gathered her support and raised an army, it was defeated at the Battle of Langside near Glasgow.  Mary Queen of Scots then fled to England where she sought the protection of her cousin Queen Elizabeth I of England.  Mary was implicated in a plot to kill the English queen and executed in 1587.

Article by Gary Knight

Get another bite of Perth and Kinross as Cake Fest returns

Get another bite of Perth and Kinross as Cake Fest returns

After a deliciously spectacular inaugural event in 2017, Cake Fest Perth and Kinross is back for a second ‘slice of the action’ in 2018 as part of the annual Winter Festival celebrations.

Bakers of all abilities, from beginner to expert, are again being invited to take up their wooden spoons and contribute to this year’s event, by reproducing their favourite building or place in Perth and Kinross in cake form. Each sculpture will then be placed on an edible map of the area, created throughout the day by Cake Fest head baker Simon Preston.

The grand unveiling of Cake Fest 2018 will take place on Sunday 18 November 2018 as part of the Perthshire Feast event in Mill Street and Horsecross Plaza. Once complete, and after an opportunity for the public to view the eyecatching cake map, it will then be sliced up and shared with festivalgoers.

New for this year, Cake Fest will feature a redesigned, larger map and will celebrate a range of local events and anniversaries, such as the 150th anniversary of Perthshire Rugby Club. Looking back even further into local history, the Cake Fest map will also be
inspired by an ancient tradition which was banned in 1577, when Perth bakers last paraded to celebrate St. Obert, the patron saint of their trade.

Bakers taking part can choose a landmark they love to be temporarily immortalised in cake or select from a list which includes:

Available Plots 

Perth City Hall
Perth Racecourse
Perth College
Perth Museum and Art Gallery
Dewar’s Aberfeldy Distillery
Ossian’s Hall
Taymouth Castle
Smeatons Bridge
Blair Castle and Hercules Garden
Dunkeld Cathedral
The Gleneagles Hotel
Pitlochry Theatre
Queen’s Bridge
General Wades Bridge and the Black Watch Monument
Atholl Palace Hotel
Enchanted Forest
Perth Leisure Pool
Perth Cenotaph
Perth Grammar School
Black Watch Castle & Museum
St John’s Kirk

Taken Plots

Crannog Centre
Huntingtower Castle
Mcdairmid Football Stadium
Kinnoull Hill Tower
A K Bell Library
Perth Concert Hall
Methven Castle
Playhouse Cinema
Bridge of Earn Institute
Beatrix Potter Garden
Pitlochry Dam and Visitor Centre
Fergusson Gallery
North Inch
Cultybraggan POW Camp
Bell’s Sports Centre
Scone Palace
Balado Golf Ball
Crieff Hydro
St. Matthew’s
Innerpeffary Library
Loch Leven Castle
Birnam Oak
South Inch
St Paul’s
Blackcraig Bridgehouse

Kinross House
Drummond Castle
Elcho Castle
Glenturret (Famous Grouse) Distillery
Glenshee

 

 

If you don’t have a Gmail account, please just email your Name, Phone numebr and the building you would like to bake to simon@cakefest.org.uk

A Day at the Black Watch Museum

A Day at the Black Watch Museum

The Black Watch Museum in Balhousie Castle in Perth is a must for anyone interested in military history. The museum has been situated in the castle since the early 1960’s, and it is packed with historical artifacts from this proud old regiment.

The museum is currently running an exhibition entitled “There But Not There”. This is a fascinating presentation on some of the men lost to us during the First World War, in which nearly 9,000 Black Watch soldiers perished, and thousands more would have suffered both terrible physical and psychological wounds. The “There But Not There” exhibition has positioned around the museum life-size perspex images of a handful of these casualties with information about who they were and tales on their life and how they met their
death. There is an exhibition of artifacts that belonged soldiers fighting in the war that have been donated by their families. A very moving booklet accompanies the presentation, but perhaps the most poignant display is the outline of a life-size soldier, this can be seen as you enter the museum grounds from the car park. I have to admit I am biased as my great grandad fought in the Battle of the Somme while serving in the Black Watch. The There but Not There display can be seen at the museum until the 11th of November – Armistice Day.

There is much more to see at the Black Watch Museum. As you enter the first section takes the visitor back to the origins of the regiment which was formed when the government were struggling to control the Highlands. It was a time of civil war as the Jacobites sought to restore the exiled Stuart King’s to their lost throne. To help police the highlands and keep an eye on the Jacobite clans the government raised six companies in 1725. In 1739 another four companies were recruited, and they became the 43rd Regiment of Foot. It was first mustered at Aberfeldy in 1740, and by the river, in Aberfeldy, a distinct monument stands to commemorate this event.

The museum tells of the part played by the Black Watch at the Battle of Fontenoy in May 1745, despite the battle being a defeat for the British. The Black Watch fought so gallantly that a French officer described them as “Highland Furies”.  The regiment was sent to fight in the American War of Independence by this time it had been renumbered to the 42nd and titled the 42nd Highland Regiment of Foot, and in America, they fought with distinction.  The museum has an excellent section on the wars against Napoleons French with many weapons and uniforms on display.

As you can imagine World War One plays a significant part in the exhibition.  With many notable attractions on display.  A kilt belonging to Captain William Debnam McLaren Stewart from the Comrie area in Perthshire who was killed at the Battle of the Somme on the 25th of September 1916 is on display.  On this kilt traces of mud from the battlefield can still be seen. Captain Stewart features in the “There But Not There” commemoration.

The exhibition then goes onto the Second World War, I was fascinated by a “Tommy Helmet”.   It had been discarded by a Scottish soldier serving in the 51st Highland Division in France in 1940.  The 51st were ordered to surrender after acting as a rear guard thus allowing thousands of British and French soldiers to escape the advancing Germans and depart from the beaches of Dunkirk back to Britain to fight again.  This helmet was found in the sea at St Valery-en-Caux in 1990. For me it made an impressive display piece, I could not help wondering just who ditched this helmet and what happened to this man?

There are opportunities for the kids to dress up in uniforms and a chance to colour in with tables pens and paper provided.  So the Black Watch Museum is a thoughtful and humbling day out for all the family, I would recommend you try to take in the “There But Not There” exhibition before it ends on the 11th of November 2018.

Article by Gary Knight

Perth’s Festival of Yarn Returns This Weekend

Perth’s Festival of Yarn Returns This Weekend

Nominated earlier this year for the Best UK Knitting Show/Event 2017/18 in the prestigious British Knitting and Crochet Awards, Perth Festival of Yarn returns to it’s home, the Dewars Centre, Perth, on 8 and 9 September for it’s third annual celebration.


This year Perth Festival of Yarn has expanded to a two-day celebration in the Fair City, however, it’s purpose remains the same; bringing boutique independent businesses, sheep-farmers and those that practice the fibre arts together to celebrate the best in textile artistry through a large marketplace, with classes and lectures to inspire.

 

Festival Director, Eva Christie, and her team are excited to be welcoming festival-goers from 17 different countries this year to an abundant yarn and fibre marketplace boasting almost 80 vendors from across the UK as well as from France, Germany, Spain and Greece.

 

Classes will be led by internationally respected tutors including Karie Westermann and Janice Anderson, and the 2018 Keynote Lecture will be delivered by Fiona Wemyss of The Wemyss School of Needlework which dates back to the 17th Century.  Event sponsors, The Knitter Magazine, will be in The Knitter Podcast Lounge where festival-goers can meet their favourite textile crafting bloggers and podcasters throughout the weekend.

 

Advance tickets are available from www.perthfestivalofyarn.uk until 8pm on Tuesday 4 September. Day entry tickets will be available on the door priced at £12.00 (accompanied under-16s) free.

The Famous Grouse Pre-Season Challenge | Glasgow Warriors V Harlequins

The Famous Grouse Pre-Season Challenge | Glasgow Warriors V Harlequins

The Famous Grouse Pre-Season Challenge | Glasgow Warriors V Harlequins

Glasgow Warriors will play English Premiership giants Harlequins in Perth in August.

‘The Famous Grouse Pre-Season Challenge’, in association with Perth & Kinross Council, will be held at Perthshire RFC’s North Inch ground in a 5,000 capacity arena on Saturday 18 August.

The match is being sponsored by The Famous Grouse and will be part of a huge weekend of activity in the city, with the rugby arena also being used for other events.

Aviva Premiership champions in 2012, Harlequins have a squad packed full of international players, such as England’s Danny Care, British & Irish Lion Kyle Sinckler and former Scotland winger Tim Visser.

The London club last played the Warriors in 2016 when Harlequins edged a pre-season victory 22-17 at the Twickenham Stoop.

Categories and Match Ticket Pricing

Match Ticket prices now includes all fees.

  • ADULT Any match ticket purchaser not eligible for the below category
  • U18 Aged 18 or under as of 1 September 2018. Proof of age must be available upon request.

Match tickets for The Famous Grouse Pre-Season Challenge will be priced as follows:

Buy Your Tickets

Frequently Asked Questions

Is there dedicated parking?

There is no dedicated parking for this event. Please use one of the long stay car parks in the city centre. Please not parking for this event is not available at Bell’s Sports Centre.

How far is the event from the train/bus Station?

The North Inch is a 15-minute walk away

Is there any standing at the event?

There is a stadium with seating and also standing space at the event

Will there be refreshments at the event?

Perthshire Rugby are providing the bar and food provision for this event.

Can tickets be bought on the day?

A limited number of tickets will be available for cash purchases only.

Is the North Inch Golf Club still open?

Yes the golf course is open as normal

 

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