St John’s Shopping Centre Win Top Environmental Award

St John’s Shopping Centre Win Top Environmental Award

St John’s Shopping Centre Win Top Environmental Award

St John’s Shopping Centre has won a Scottish Green Apple Environment Award in the international campaign to find the greenest companies, councils and communities.

The shopping centre have won the award for their Greenspace project that was completed in partnership with children from Goodlyburn Primary School in 2018, where the children planned, designed and created an urban garden in the heart of Perth City Centre with the aim of creating space for biodiversity to thrive.

They competed against more than 500 other nominations in the Green Apple Awards for Environmental Best Practice, and they will be presented with their trophy and certificate at a glittering presentation ceremony on March 18, 2019.

Derek Martin, Marketing Manager at St John’s Shopping Centre said: “The whole team at St John’s Shopping Centre and the children of P1-3G at Goodlyburn Primary School were thrilled to learn that the project has been recognised by the industry leaders who judged our application.

“We are delighted to have won a Green Apple Award for Environmental Best Practice. Having also been finalists at the Scottish Environmental Business Awards earlier this year It’s great to see that our conscious effort to reduce our impact on the environment has been recognised yet again.”

As a result of this Green Apple Award success, they have been invited to have their winning paper published in The Green Book, the leading international work of reference on environmental best practice, so that others around the world can follow their example and learn from their achievement.

They could also progress to represent their country in the Green World Awards 2020 and have 100 trees planted in their name as part of the United Nations Billion Trees initiative.

The Green Apple Awards began in 1994 and have become established as the country’s major recognition for environmental endeavour among companies, councils, communities and countries.

The awards are organised by The Green Organisation – an international, independent, non-political, non-profit environment group dedicated to recognising, rewarding and promoting environmental best practice around the world. The Green Apple Awards are supported by the Environment Agency, the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health, the Chartered Institution for Wastes Management and other independent bodies.

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St William of Perth

St William of Perth

St William of Perth

There can not be many cities in the country that has had one of its former inhabitants canonised and created a Saint.  The City of Perth has its own saint and here is his story.

There was a man called William who lived in Perth around the later years of the 1100s. He was a baker and was deeply religious, going to church every Sunday without fail. William was a kindly and considerate man who was liked and respected by the population of the Fair City.  When he had finished baking the days bread, he carefully took out one loaf from every ten and put it aside to give to the poor of the town.

Early one morning he was walking to his bakery as he passed St John’s Church he saw a wicker basket lying in the doorway.  Upon inspection, he saw that the basket contained a sleeping baby. William gently picked up this basket and took it to the warmth of his bakery.

 As he worked, he thought about this baby, it was clearly abandoned, he then decided as he had no children and was financially secure he could bring this child up as if it were his own.  The child was a wee boy and William named it David, he gave it a stable, good life with much love and kindness, the child was called by the locals David the Foundling and as the years rolled by grew up into a healthy young man helping his father in the bakery.

In 1201,  William realised he wanted to go on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land as he prepared he asked his son to accompany him on this journey. Grudgingly, David agreed, he had friends and a good life in Perth and was not at all keen on leaving the city.

The two men set off travelling through Scotland and into England visiting the religious sites as they went.  William and David were just a little bit north of the town of Rochester when they fell out and had a terrible argument at the roadside.  David in a fit of rage, struck his father a violent blow on the head, the older man fell to the ground, David then drew a dagger and cut his father’s throat.  He then robbed his benefactor and fled the murder scene.

A short time later a local woman who had a reputation of being mad stumbled upon the body.  The woman was wearing a garland of Honeysuckle upon her head. She stood staring quietly at the corpse for some time and then she took the Honeysuckle from her head and placed it on the head of the dead man.  After leaving the flowers on the cadaver for a while, she took it and set it back upon her head. In an instant, her madness was cured. She walked down into the town of Rochester, locals who knew this woman realised that her illness had left her and summoned the priests from Rochester Cathedral.  She told her story and took the holy men to the murder scene. William was taken back to the Cathedral and laid out on public display.

News of this murder and the mad woman being miraculously cured spread far and wide, folk with ailments flocked to the cathedral and touched the corpse.  Many were healed upon touching the body of William. William was buried within Rochester Cathedral, a chapel was built on the site of the murder. The sick and infirm flocked from all over the land to touch the grave and hopefully be healed.  The shrine of William became the second most popular holy shrine in England, second only to that of Thomas Becket at Canterbury.

William was canonised by Pope Alexander IV in 1256 and became St William of Perth, he is the patron saint of adopted children.  In 1883 a wall painting was found in Frindsbury Church near Rochester depicting William it was found to have been painted between 1256 and 1266.  He is still remembered in the town of Rochester, with a street in Rochester called St William’s Way, there was a Hospital in the town called St William’s Hospital and St William of Perth Primary School all pay homage to this man from Perth.

It is a shame that this child of Perth and his story seems to be better known in the South of England than it is in his home city.  Perhaps on his feast day the 23rd of May you might spare a thought for St William of Perth.

Written by Gary Knight

Can’t Get Enough of Gary’s Stories?

 

If you enjoyed this article, why not take a look at Garys book ‘No Fair City’?

Battles, regicides, executions, conspiracies, murders, floods, fires, crimes, punishments, and mayhem No Fair City by Gary Knight has them all. Delve into the darker side of historical Perth, where witches, smugglers, grave robbers, murderers, and thieves conduct their ghastly business. Learn how the guilty (and innocent) were tried, punished, and executed. Read how, in a world before health and safety, plague, fire, the merciless River Tay, and the Perth s lade, railways and roads, took their daily toll of townsfolk and visitors.

You can find it here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Picture Perfect Perthshire

Picture Perfect Perthshire

Picture Perfect Perthshire

It’s no secret Perthshire has some of the best viewpoints in Scotland. In fact, a quick search of Instagram returns over 140,000 photos tagged with #Perthshire.

From rolling hills and hidden lochs to idyllic towns and ancient castles and palaces – there’s enough natural beauty to keep any avid photographer content for weeks. And with so much to see and do on offer, it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the choice and miss out on some best views this country has to offer.
So this week, we have been working with amature photographers and Perthshire locals to help find the best viewpoints around the region.

Without any further ado, here’s a quick look at our favourite picture-perfect spots from around Perthshire!

1) Queens View, Pitlochry

Description: Queen’s view is one of the most popular in the region – and it’s not hard to see why. Overlooking the stunning Loch Tummel and Schiehallion, this viewpoint you don’t want to miss!

Distance from Perth City Centre: 34 miles

Whilst your here, why not visit…

Highland Fling

The Pass of Killiecrankie is one of the most striking views in the whole country, so why not take it in from a different angle – by plunging down 40 metres below with a bungee cord attached to your feet!

Find out more

Atholl Palace

A historic four-star luxury hotel set in Highland Perthshire, Pitlochry, with spa, museum, award-winning gardens and break taking mountain and river views. Best of all, it’s just a 45-minute drive from Perth City Centre!

Find out more

Pitlochry Golf Course

With the 6-hole Lettoch Links course, a driving range and a fully-stocked pro-shop, it has everything you need for a fantastic day of golf in Highland Perthshire!

Find out more

2) Loch Turret

Description: Loch Turret Reservoir is one of the lesser-known lochs in Perthshire, however, it is certainly not to be overlooked as a great picture opportunity! This hidden gem is the perfect spot for a hill walk (or sledging!)

Distance from Perth City Centre: 23 miles

Whilst your here, why not visit…

The Famous Grouse Experience

Discover how the distillery’s single malt is blended to create one of the UK’s most popular blended whiskies.

Find out more.

The Crieff Hydro

Scotland’s leading Spa Hotel Resort has so much to do, with 60 in/outdoor activities and 5 quality eateries.

Find out more.

Innerpeffray Library

Discover Scotland’s oldest free, public
lending library: a museum where you can iterally touch the past.

Find out more.

3) Kinnoull Hill, Perth

Description: A list of Instagram-worthy spots around Perthshire would not be complete without mentioning Kinnoull Hill.  This viewpoint is only a short walk from Perth City Centre and offers magnificent views of the Tay Valley!

Distance from Perth City Centre: 2 miles

Whilst your here, why not visit…

Willowgate Activity Centre

A leading activites provider based just outside of Perth City Centre. Whether it’s in the water or on dry land, Willowgate has something for everyone!

Find out more.

A City Centre Eatery

Did you know that Perth was voted Scotland’s Food Town on the Year last year? Our city is bursting with independent coffeehouses and award-winning restaurants. Why not pop in and test a few of our eateries out?

Find out more

Scone Palace

Scone Palace is the true home of the Stone of Destiny and has been the seat of parliaments and the crowning place of the Kings of Scots, including Macbeth and Robert the Bruce.

Find out more.

4) The Hermitage, Dunkeld

Description: The Hermitage is perhaps one of the most visited nature spots in Perthshire and for a good reason! There’s plenty of picture opportunities in this natural woodland.

Distance from Perth City Centre: 20 miles

Whilst your here, why not visit…

The Atholl Arms Hotel

There are few more imposing sights in the Scottish Highlands than the grandeur of the Atholl Arms Hotel in Dunkeld, at the northern end of this delightful highland village.

Find out more.

Birnam Arts

A delightful multi-purpose arts, conferencing and entertainment venue encompassing the fantastic Foyer CafePotter’s Junction Gift Shop and the Beatrix Potter Exhibition.

Find out more

Loch of the Lowes Visitor Centre

From early April to late August, the star attraction is a pair of breeding ospreys, which nest just 150 metres from our observation hide.

Find out more.

5) Loch Earn, St Fillans

Description: A beautiful a freshwater loch with an amazing backdrop of Ben Vorlich and the surrounding mountain range. Definitely worth a look!
The loch is home to a Watersports Centre that offer multiple watersports activities.

Distance from Perth City Centre: 32 miles

Whilst your here, why not visit…

Auchingarrich Wildlife Park

Whatever the weather you’ll find plenty to see and do, with activities for all ages indoors and out. The centre has over 50 different species of animal, each with its own particular charm.

Find out more.

Cultybraggan POW Camp

Cultybraggan Camp, near Comrie, Perthshire is the last remaining WWII Prisoner of War (POW) Camp in Scotland.

Find out more.

Comrie’s Earthquake House

Did you know Comrie’s is the earthquake capital of the UK? As a result, the ‘earthquake house’ was built in 1874 to monitor tremors in the ground. Pop along and take a look at this unique piece of history!

Find out more.

Over to you!

Now you know where the best viewpoints are, it’s now over to get snapping. In case you aren’t familiar with Perthshire, here’s a map to help you find all the viewpoints mentioned above.

Make sure to follow us on Instagram to find more amazing photo spots from around Perthshire!

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A Wilder Scotland in Perth: RSGS Talk

A Wilder Scotland in Perth: RSGS Talk

It wasn’t long ago that wild forests stretched their fingers across much of Scotland. Beavers and cranes found sanctuary in extensive wetlands, salmon and trout filled Scotland’s rivers, and lynx, wolf and wild boar stalked woodland glades.

Today, Scotland has become a much more nature-depleted nation. All of our large carnivores have gone and across huge areas the intricate and balanced ecosystem that emerged from the last ice age has unravelled.

It doesn’t have to be this way. A bold vision for Scotland’s future is evolving; a vision that sees native woodland regenerating; a vision where damaged peatlands are restored, and rivers lined by alder and willow run freely; a vision that sees a wilder landscape driven by natural processes, supporting a much broader range of wildlife than exists today.

This new vision is being spearheaded by a group of photographers and filmmakers who have spent the last three years gathering images to make the case for a wilder Scotland. And one of these campaigners is Peter Cairns, a conservation photographer based in the Cairngorms.

Now, Peter is speaking in Perth and showcasing his stunning images. With spectacular mountaintops and ocean floors, and featuring iconic species such as beavers, ospreys and pine martens, Peter will pose an intriguing question: What should Scotland look like?

Commenting on the upcoming talk, Peter said:

“I’m delighted to be part of an inspiring line up of speakers all with fascinating stories to tell. From my home in the Cairngorms, I’m lucky to be able to look out onto forests of Scots pine, hills of granite and the rushing waters of the River Feshie. Spectacular a place though this is, there are pieces missing.”

“Today, although it’s easy to be seduced by the raw beauty of the Scottish landscape, it is sadly an ecological shadow of its former self. Our native woodland covers just 2% of its former range, many species that were once prolific now teeter on the edge, and our large carnivores are all gone. My presentations for the Royal Scottish Geographical Society will showcase this country’s undoubted beauty and drama, but against a backdrop of global biodiversity decline”

Mike Robinson, Chief Executive of the RSGS remarked:

“Scotland’s landscape is one of its most treasured assets, and this talk by Peter will demonstrate our country’s raw beauty in spectacular fashion. It is, however, a landscape under pressure and one that is not as untouched by humans as it may first appear. I hope this talk will inspire our audiences to think more closely about ‘wilderness’ in general and some of the possible mechanisms we might adopt to conserve, re-invigorate and improve our natural assets.”

Peter will be speaking in Perth on Tuesday 12th March at 7.30pm in The Salutation Hotel, 34 South Street, Perth, PH2 8PH.

Tickets to see Peter are available via Eventbrite or on the door. They are £10 for visitors, £8 for Tiso Outdoor Experience Cardholders, and FREE for RSGS Members, Students and U18s.

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Mary Queen of Scots and Loch Leven Castle

Mary Queen of Scots and Loch Leven Castle

January saw the opening of a new film about Mary Queen of Scots, and although I have yet still to go to the Playhouse in Perth to watch the film,  I thought I would write about a famous event involving Mary that took place in Perth and Kinross – the imprisonment of the queen at Loch Leven Castle.

Mary Queen of Scots is perhaps one of Scotland’s most tragic monarchs,  she was born in Linlithgow Palace on the 8th of December 1542.  Her father James V was not exactly over the moon when he was told of the birth of his daughter.  He was lying in his sick bed in Falkland Palace and upon receiving the news exclaimed rather sadly “it came wi a lass and it will gang wi a lass” he was referring to the Stewart or Stuart dynasty.   Mary’s father James died six days later on the 14th of December. 

The infant was crowned queen on the 9th of September 1543 she was less than a year old.  The King of England Henry VIII tried to persuade the Scottish nobility that the young queen should marry his son and when this was rejected he sent his armies into Scotland to force the issue.  This is referred to as the Rough Wooing, with Scotland being subjected to these English raids the queen was sent to France where she married the heir to the French throne in 1558.  The following year Mary’s husband was crowned Francois II of France.  The time in France was to be the happiest of her life, but it was not to last, for in 1560 the young French king died,  Mary was sent back to Scotland arriving in Leith in 1561.

Things were extremely difficult for her, she was a Catholic while most of her subjects including her nobility were Protestant.  Mary married her cousin Henry Stewart Lord Darnley in 1565, despite having a child together it was not a happy union.  Darnley was spoilt, immature and a womaniser.  He was manipulated into being involved in murdering Mary’s secretary David Rizzio, this crime was carried out in the queen’s chambers in Holyrood Palace.  Mary who was pregnant at the time never forgave her husband for his part in the murder.  Lord Darnley himself was to die in suspicious circumstances, while sick he was convalescing in a building called Kirk o Field in Edinburgh. 

One night while Mary was out celebrating a wedding Kirk o Field was blown up.  Darnley’s body was found outside in the grounds, he had been murdered.  The chief suspect in this assassination was Lord Bothwell, many people at the time also thought Mary herself had a hand in the killing of her husband.  Mary Queen of Scots then committed political suicide by marrying Lord Bothwell, this prompted a rebellion by her lords.  Mary was overthrown, she was taken into custody and them imprisoned in Loch Leven Castle.

Loch Leven castle sits on the biggest island on Loch Leven, it is owned by Historic Scotland and open to the public.  It is well worth a visit, especially on a nice day.  The castle was to be Mary’s prison for just over ten months arriving on the 17th of June 1567 and leaving on the morning of the 3rd of May 1568.  Imprisonment here was to be the low point of Mary’s time in Scotland, while held Mary miscarried twins that had been conceived with Lord Bothwell. Her jailers were The Douglases, a powerful family who had played a prominent role in Scotland’s history since the days of Robert the Bruce. 

Lady Douglas had been the mistress of the queen’s father King James V , she was the mother of James Stewart the Earl of Moray, Mary’s half brother, Moray was to become regent while Mary was locked up, running the country on behalf of the queen’s young son James VI.  The queen was confined to two rooms on the third floor of the tower.  Lady Douglas was to share a bedroom with the queen, so Mary had very little privacy.  She spent her long days walking in the garden or doing needlework. 

Her supporters on the outside were desperate to secure her freedom, they knew Mary’s life was in danger, her jailers had been told to kill Mary if an escape attempt was made by her followers.  Mary did make an effort to escape on one occasion a laundress had been brought to the castle and Mary who was up early swapped clothing with this woman. Covering her face, Mary made it down to the boat,  she was being rowed across the loch when one of the boatmen foiled the plan, he noticed how white, soft and smooth the ladies hands looked. 

A second attempt was to be successful, Mary was helped by one of her jailers he was Willie Douglas an eighteen-year-old youth who was captivated by the charismatic queen.  On the night of the 2nd of May, he managed to obtain the master key to the tower.  When the rest of the household were celebrating May Day with a masked ball, Willie made his way to the queen’s room.  Releasing the queen, they made their way to a boat and rowed across the loch to freedom.

Once free Mary gathered her support and raised an army, it was defeated at the Battle of Langside near Glasgow.  Mary Queen of Scots then fled to England where she sought the protection of her cousin Queen Elizabeth I of England.  Mary was implicated in a plot to kill the English queen and executed in 1587.

Article by Gary Knight

8 Ways to Celebrate Burns Night in Perthshire

8 Ways to Celebrate Burns Night in Perthshire

 

Burns night is nearly upon us! 

Celebrated annually on Robert Burns’ birthday, 25 January, Burns Night gathers Scots and Scots-at-heart around the world to pay tribute to the great poet’s life and works. There will be haggis eating, ceilidh dancing, songs, poetry and more, but most importantly – good company and loads of fun.

Whatever way you want to celebrate Burns Night, Perth can cater for all! With several organised Burns nights happening in Perth and also some great local butchers where you can pick up a fantastic Haggis to cook yourself.  We are sure you can find your own way to pay tribute to the great Scottish poet!

To get the ball rolling we have been on the hunt to find the best ways to celebrate Burns night in the Fair City.

Without further ado, here are the 6 top ways to celebrate Burns Night in Perth this year.

 

1) Explore The Riverside Night Lights ‘Burns Theme’

When: Jan 26 – Jan 27 from 17:00 

Where: Norie-Miller Walk, Perth, PH2 7TR

On Saturday 26 and Sunday 27 January, Perth will celebrate the contribution Robert Burns has made to Scottish culture, with live entertainment and fun with a Scottish twist as part of the Riverside Light Nights. On Saturday 26 there will also be a themed parade starting in Perth city centre, and heading over the bridge to bring participants to Norie Miller Park. There will be a parade on Saturday 26th Jan starting in the City Centre at 17:00. There is no parade on Sunday 27th Jan. Please note that there may be pyrotechnics at these events.

 

 

2) Indulge in a Wine Dinner at the Dunkled House Hotel 

When: Friday 25th January

Where: Dunkeld House Hotel,  Blairgowrie Rd, Dunkeld PH8 0HX

Enjoy an exclusive evening of fine food and wine to celebrate Scotland’s bard. Join us on Friday 25th January 2019 from 7.30pm.
Join Dunkeld House Hotel for an evening with Matthew Clark, who will talk you through some of their fine wines. Book your place now and enjoy a 5 course menu created by our chef to compliment the wines.

 

2) Stay over at the Salutation Hotel

HotelWhen: Sunday 27th January 

Where: Salutation hotel 34 South Street, Perth, PH2 8PH

Planning on visiting the Riverside Light Nights? It’s set to be a big event this year with the ‘Red Hot Chilli Pipers’ playing as part of the special Burns Night celebrations on Sunday 27th January at Norie Miller Park. Enjoy the night from start to finish by booking our Sunday Night Saver from only £27.50 per person including full Scottish breakfast. Then after the live show head back to the Salutation and enjoy a delicious bar meal as our food is served from 12 till 9pm. Call now to book our fantastic Sunday Saver. 01738 630066

 

 

3) Celebrate With The Perth Burns Club

When: Saturday, January 27, 2017, 18:30 for 19:00

Where: Salutation Hotel, 30-34 South St, Perth PH2 8PH

The club’s Annual Dinner, widely recognised as being one of the country’s leading Burns Nights and also one of Perth’s foremost social occasions, will be held in the Salutation Hotel, for the 40th consecutive year on Saturday, on the 27th January from 6.30pm for 7pm. The Immortal Memory is to be proposed by Donald Paton, Donald is current President of The Burns Club of Vancouver and also Honorary Life President of The Perth Burns Club. The Toast to The Lasses will be proposed by Councillor Willie Wilson, the Depute Provost of Perth & Kinross.  The Reply from the Lasses will be given by former Councillor Joan McEwen. 

The entertainment will be of the accustomed high standard. Further details are provided on the club’s website.

Dress for the function is optional but the wearing of formal or Highland dress is encouraged. The ticket price is £27 for Club members and their spouses and £32 for non-members.

There is no limit to the number of guest tickets allowed but, as recent dinners have seen high attendances and numbers are limited to 175, early booking is advised.  Although dress for the function is optional, the wearing of evening or Highland dress is strongly encouraged.  Any special seating or dietary requests should be mentioned on the reply form.  Please note that we cannot offer refunds for bookings cancelled less than 48 hours prior to the Dinner unless the places can be filled from a waiting list.

 

4) Enjoy a tipple or two at Brewdog Perth!

Burns nightWhen: Friday, January 25, 2019 at 12 PM – 11:59 PM

Where: BrewDog Perth 62/64 George Street, PH1 5JL Perth, Perth and Kinross

Join us for Burns Night and celebrate like the Scots!

We’ll have Scottish beer, music and whisky! Plus our ever popular veggie haggis pizza returns! And we’ll be giving anyone who sports a kilt a pint on us!

 

 

5) Dance the Night Away at the Strathardle Inn

Burns NightWhen: Friday, January 25, 2019, at 7 PM – 11 PM

Where: The Strathardle Inn, Kirkmichael, nr Blairgowrie, PH10 7NS Perth And Kinross, United Kingdom

Join us on Friday 25th January for a traditional Burns Supper with customary addresses, toasts and poetry followed by evening entertainment of Disco and Ceilidh from Bruce Entertainments. Burns Supper:Cullen Skink, Chicken Liver Pate or Potato & Leek Soup (v) Haggis, Needs or Tatties with whisky Sauce or Vegetarian on request Clootie Pudding or Cranachan £15 per person, booking required for meal only. Evening entertainment is open to all. We look forward to seeing you all there.

 

 

6) Tuck into a Burns Supper at the Crieff Hydro

HaggisWhen: Friday, January 25, 2019 at 7 PM – 11 PM

Where: Crieff Hydro Ferntower Road Crieff, PH7 3LQ Crieff

Celebrate Burns Night the traditional way – with lots of friends and plenty to eat and drink! This year, our Burns Supper cost £45 a head and includes all of this:- Piped entrance – Scottish Gin cocktail on arrival – Address to the Haggis – 4-course meal with 3 whisky pairings To book call 01764 655 555 or send us a message on Facebook.

 

 

7)  Show your support at the Perthshire Rugby Burns Night

Burns nightWhen: January 26, 2019 at 6:30 PM – 10:30 PM

Where: Loft Nightclub Pert h145-151 South Street, PH2 8N Perth, Perth and Kinross

Perthshire Rugby Burns’ Night returns to the Loft on Saturday 26th January. This is a whole club social event and everyone, (members, players, supporters age 18+ from all sections) is welcome. Itinerary: Arrive in That Bar from 6pm Piped in at 7pm. Traditional 3 course meal. Speeches and recitals from members & players across the rugby club membership. Price is £25 each payable on the night. To secure your places or offer a contribution to the night, please email our club captain, Ewan. clubcaptain@perthshire-rfc.co.uk See you there!

 

8) Enjoy a Delicious Traditional Meal from Locally Sourced Suppliers

Simon Howie Butchers 

Simon Howie haggis and puddings are made from their own traditional recipe by their team of award-winning chefs and butchers. They pride themselves on only using the finest ingredients when producing their delicious range of haggis and puddings.

As well as being Scotland’s national dish commonly eaten to celebrate Burns night in January, haggis is a hugely versatile ingredient which can be enjoyed year round.

Who would have thought you could get such a selection of haggis. Howies supply: The Original Haggis, The Wee Haggis, Sliced Haggis, Cheiftan Haggis.

Find out more on their website

DG Linday Butchers 15 North  Methven Street, Perth PH1 5PN 

An award-winning family run butcher business based in Perth, Scotland, established for over 100 years.
We pride ourselves on a personal and friendly service whilst maintaining the traditional standards of customer care.

Provender Brown Delicatessen  23 George St, Perth PH1 5JY

A delight not to be missed, Provender Brown has won a number of prestigious national awards reflecting the range of produce, excellent customer service and general “deli attitude”.

PS: Don’t forget to bring your Perth Gift Card with you, as these businesses (plus many other brilliant independent businesses) accept the gift card!

 

However you chose to celebrate the night, you are guaranteed to find the perfect celebration in Perth!

Have a great Burns Night!

Four Go Wild in Wellies is back on the road!

Four Go Wild in Wellies is back on the road!

Indepen-dance 4 is delighted to be back out on tour in February and March with Four Go Wild in Wellies, its award-winning show for 3-5 year olds. Featuring bobble hats, scarves, tents that have a life of their own and, of course, lots of fun in wellies, the show has been described by The Herald in its 4-star review as ‘a very clever dance piece’.
 
Four Go Wild in Wellies is a playful look at the joy of inventiveness and curiosity; the negotiation of social structures; how friendships are built, broken and mended; the spectrum between collaboration and competition; play that emerges from interaction with each other and with the world around including, particularly, the natural world.
 
The show has been created with the company by director Anna Newell (2017 Tonic Theatre Award winner for ‘women who are changing the face of UK Theatre’), award-winning composer David Goodall and choreographer Stevie Prickett, a team who have worked together for more than 20 years creating work for younger audiences.
 
Indepen-dance 4 are gaining a reputation for innovative and high quality touring productions. Its four dancers – Hayley EarlamEmma SmithNeil Price and Adam Sloan – have worked with some of the UK’s leading choreographers and musicians over a number of years. For this tour, Julie Spence will replace Emma Smith for the performances at the Waterside on Sunday 24 February and at Gosforth Civic Theatre on Monday 25 February. Blair Flucker will replace Neil Price at Pitlochry Festival Theatre on Saturday 9 March and Macrobert Arts Centre on Sunday 10 March. He will also replace Adam Sloan at The Atkinson on Saturday 16 March and at  Z-arts on Sunday 17 March. 
LISTINGS
Joan Knight studio, Perth Theatre |  Sat 2 Feb 10am + 11.30am £7.50/£5 | 01738 621031 | horsecross.co.uk
 
Lochgelly Centre (Fife) Sun 3 Feb 11am + 2pm £6.50  01592 583303 | onfife.com
 
Music Hall (Aberdeen) Sat 9 & Sun 10 Feb 10.30am +  1pm £5  01224 641122 aberdeenperformingarts.com
 
Luton Library Theatre Wed 20 Feb 11.30am + 2.30pm £5 01582 878100 | lutonculture.com
 
The Grand (Clitheroe) Fri 22 Feb | 11am + 2pm | £6/£5 (adv) 01200 421599 thegrandvenue.co.uk
 
Waterside (Sale) Sun 24 Feb 11am + 2.30pm £7/£5  0161 912 5616 | watersidearts.org
 
Gosforth Civic Theatre (Newcastle Upon Tyne) Mon 25 Feb 11am + 4pm £5/£3 0191 284 3700 | gosforthcivictheatre.co.uk
 
Pitlochry Festival Theatre Sat 9 Mar 12noon £7/£5 (under 18s) | £20 (family ticket) 01796 484626 | pitlochryfestivaltheatre.com
 
Macrobert Arts Centre (Stirling) Sun 10 Mar 2pm £9.50 £34 (Wee Group Saver) 01786 466666 | macrobertartscentre.org
 
Aberystwyth Arts Centre Fri 15 Mar 1pm + 5pm £8/£6 01970 623232 | aberystwythartscentre.co.uk
 
The Atkinson (Southport) Sat 16 Mar | 1pm + 3pm £8/£6 £24 (family ticket) 01704 533333 | theatkinson.co.uk
 
Z-arts (Manchester) Sun 17 Mar 11am (relaxed perf) + 2.30pm £9/£6 0161 232 6089 | z-arts.org
Winter break in Perthshire?

Winter break in Perthshire?

Feeling the post-Christmas blues?

Why not cheer yourself up by taking a break to Perthshire .

There are many great deals on accommodation at over this winter so come to enjoy all that Perth has to offer.

Perth is also only about an hour away from Glenshee ski resort. So if we get some snow this winter (fingers crossed) then Perth is the perfect place to come back to after a long day on the slopes.

If you fancy a unique experience than the Perth Riverside Light Nights are running from Jan 26 – Feb 10. 

Perth also has a wide range of local shops, cafes and restaurants to explore as well so you will never be bored. This would also be the perfect time to use a Perth card if you got one as a Christmas present. 

Celebrate Valentine’s Day at Mercure – 1 night package offer

Book before the 17th February for stays between 8th to 18th February 2019.

Inspiring breaks in Perth this winter from only £135 per couple

Book up until 27th February 2019

Dinner, Bed and Breakfast

Available November, December, January & February (excludes some festive break dates, Scottish Shindig Breaks 18th & 25th and Valentines 17th February.

Scottish shindig break

Saturday 19th January or 26th January

Valentines Break

Available 16th February 2019.

Winter sparkles

Available till the 31st of January, the 1st till the 13th and 18th and 28th of February   

February break

Available from the 3rd till the 11th and 18th till the 28th of February.

Romantic night away

Available from the 14th till the 16th of February 

January break

Available till the 31st of January. (Tuesday to Friday only)

2 nights with dinner and breakfast.  

Available from the 1st of February till the 31st of March.   

2 Night Winter break 

Available before the 8th of February 

Bubbles and love (3-night stay)

1st to the 28th of February 

Wee winter adventures (3 Night midweek)

Available all of March.

Other hotels in Perth 

Royal George Hotel

The Royal George Hotel, Tay Street Perth PH1 5LD
Scotland

Leonardo Boutique Hotel Huntingtower Perth

Crieff Road, Perth, PH1 3JT

 

 

The Station Hotel

The Station Hotel, 1 Leonard Street, Perth PH2 8HE, UK

 

New County Hotel

22-30 County Pl, Perth PH2 8EE

Best Western Queens Hotel

Leonard St, Perth PH2 8HB

Complete list of accommodation in Perth 

Header image by @ekelly68541 (IG) — at Kinnoull Hill.

The Maiden Castle and Well

The Maiden Castle and Well

Scotland is full of fantastic tails of the supernatural, with stories of mythical beasts and ghostly occurrences.  If you are interested in tales from the other world, then you will have come across lots of accounts of people interacting with the Fairies.  These little creatures were not the cute Tinkerbell from Peter Pan but often sinister and malevolent, at worst evil and at best merely mischievous, but defiantly something to be feared.  The modern practice of fairy doors (a small wooden door) in your house for decoration or to entice the “little folk’ into your home would have filled our ancestors with dread. 

It was thought that at one time the fairy folk or the Sidhe or Shee as they were known lived side by side with man.  Then the fairy’s and mankind went to war.  We were victorious and the Shee were all banished underground to the dark recesses of this land.  The fairy and mankind are enemies and one day the Shee will rise and take what is rightfully their’s again, our world above ground. 

The Shee only move around above ground at night and their armies can be heard in the darkness by the sound of their horses bridles jingling.  They dress in green a colour thought by us to be unlucky as to wear green might offend the Shee.  My granny who only died twelve years ago would never wear green and when asked why would reply “it is the fairies colour”.

Perthshire has many areas connected with the Shee.  Glenshee, as its name suggests, means the glen of the fairies and Schiehallion is the fairy hill of the Caledonians.  But the story I want to tell you about took place near Glendevon, an area rich in fairy lore with a nearby hill being named Ben Shee. 

A piper was walking along the old drove road through Glenquey between Glendevon and Dollar.  At the top of the glen stands a fairy mound known as the Maiden Castle.  This piper was walking towards the mound when to his astonishment he heard the sound of music and laughter he looked up and saw where the fairy mound sits, a magnificent castle, with lights shining from the windows and flags flying from the turreted towers. A precision of fairies came from the main gate. 

The terrified piper turned to run, but the Little Folk some mounted on small horses caught up with the man, he was made a prisoner and taken back to the castle. 

In the great hall, the fairies were having a banquet, they made the piper stand in the corner of the room and play his pipes while the little people danced and danced,  this went on all night and the next day.  The piper was exhausted and pleaded to be set free, he wanted to return to his family and he knew that they would be worried about him.  The king of the Shee said that they would release the captive piper if he played one last tune, the fairy leaders favourite.  The piper put his pipes to his lips and played this tune for all his worth.  Again the fairies danced in a big circle.  When the piper finished, he was taken to the main gate of the castle and set free

The grateful man made his way home as quickly as he could, when he arrived at his house and walked in the front door, there was no one there he recognised, not his wife or children only one bent old man sitting by the fire.  When the piper asked the man at the fire the whereabouts of his family, the old man knew nothing.  But he did say that many years ago when he was a boy, his grandfather had told him a story of a piper going missing in Glenquey, he just vanished into thin air. Everyone thought he must have had an accident or got lost, but a body was never found.  For while the piper thought had been playing his pipes in the fairy mound for a day or two, in our time, he had been missing for more than a hundred years.

There are a few similar stories from all over Scotland about people going disappearing and their disappearance being blamed on the fairies.  Some people now recognise the similarities between these stories and current cases of alien abduction, so perhaps it was not the Shee who abducted these people after all.

Just beyond the mound of Maiden Castle is the Maiden Well, this well is reputed to be haunted.  The story goes, a beautiful maiden who was imprisoned in Castle Campbell was allowed to walk the hills behind the castle.  She often walked to the well and drank its water. Now her spirit can sometimes be seen around the well at night and if any unsuspecting traveller captivated by her beauty tries to steal a kiss from this young enchantress when their lips touch and the ghostly figure kisses you it will cause you to suffer a fatal heart attack.     

I sat and had a flask of coffee on top of the Maiden Castle enjoying the stunning view down the glen.  When I finished and was walking away, I thought just for a second that I could hear the faint sound of music, it may have been my imagination, or maybe.

The area is managed by the Woodland Trust and offers many excellent walks, it is well worth a visit.

Female Co-Founder of Social Bite Recognised

Female Co-Founder of Social Bite Recognised

The Livingstone Medal is named in Honour of David Livingstone, the famed missionary who worked to address inequality in parts of Africa during the 19th Century. And since the award was bequeathed in 1901, it has developed an incredible heritage of its own, becoming one of the Society’s most prestigious honours.

As such, Alice’s name will be added to an illustrious list of previous Livingstone Medallists including Ernest Shackleton, Edmund Hillary, Neil Armstrong and, more recently, Annie Lennox and Mary Robinson.

Commenting on the award Alice said:

“I want to thank the RSGS from the bottom of my heart for this incredible recognition. It’s particularly special to be recognised as the lesser-known, younger and female co-founder of Social Bite. Though we, of course, don’t do the work we do for awards, it truly leaves a profound feeling of unity and support to receive such a prestigious Medal.”

Founded in 2012, Social Bite began life as a small sandwich chain in Edinburgh. But it was no ordinary sandwich chain – as customers bought their food they could “pay forward” a meal for a homeless person to collect later. It was good food for a good cause.

From these humble but thoughtful beginnings, Social Bite has gone from strength to strength, focussing the national spotlight on this important social issue, one meal at a time.

Today, the charitable enterprise comprises a high-end restaurant in Edinburgh with the same “pay it forward” ethos as the sandwich shops. And a large proportion of their staff are now made up of people who have, in the past, directly experienced homelessness. Social Bite has also developed a supported village in Edinburgh to allow 20 homeless people each year to find their feet and begin a journey back into society. And, of course, it also runs regular “Sleep Outs” in cities across Scotland to fund their charitable aims.

Reflecting on her exciting journey with Social Bite, Alice commented:

“From a life-changing trip to Bangladesh, to painting our first shop, to employing our first ever person suffering from homelessness, and the incredible array of projects Social Bite is now responsible for – our journey has been a whirlwind of false starts, long days and ignoring the word ‘no’ repeatedly, which has been both challenging and great fun!”

But she also made a point of celebrating her long-time business partner, Josh Littlejohn:

“My co-founder Josh is something of a crazy genius. He has brought me great inspiration and support over the years – and I hope I have for him too.”

Commenting on the award, Mike Robinson, Chief Executive of the RSGS said:

“Through the offer of food, training, jobs and accommodation, Social Bite has helped break the cycle of exclusion faced by many homeless people, and done it in a way which provides respect and protects their dignity. But, perhaps more importantly, Social Bite has forced the issue of homelessness up the political agenda and made us all reconsider our response to this age-old problem.

“We’re delighted to be able to celebrate Alice’s contribution to this wonderful enterprise, and I hope this recognition will encourage her in her next adventures. We look forward to working with her as she continues to promote and enact positive changes across Scotland.”


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